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Health Bulletin Spring 2011


Breastfeeding is Better than Formula

Breastfeeding helps mothers bond with their babies. Mother’s milk has antibodies that protect newborns from infection. It provides nutrients to help babies grow, and it’s free!

Follow these tips to help you get started:

1) While you are pregnant:

  • Go to classes about childbirth and breastfeeding.
  • Talk with women who breastfed.
  • Plan for someone to help you with housework.



2) In the hospital after delivery:

  • Breastfeed your baby as soon as possible, and often.
  • If you have problems at first, keep trying!
  • The more you breastfeed, the easier it will be.
  • Hold your baby close to your face (they love to look at faces).
  • Ask to talk with a breastfeeding counselor before you leave. They are happy to help!

3) At home:

  • Keep your baby near, so you can hear when he or she is hungry.
  • Learn to breastfeed standing up, so you can walk around at the same time.
  • Wait two weeks before giving your baby breastmilk in a bottle.

For more tips, click here.

Cook Meats Safely for Easter, Passover, and other Spring Celebrations
Spring can be a time for festive meals, but undercooked meats can cause food poisoning. Cook your ham, turkey, lamb, or other meat safely this year! Use a meat thermometer, and make sure you cook these meats until they are the right temperature inside:

  • Ground meat and meat mixtures: 165 F
  • Fresh beef, veal, and lamb: 145 F
  • Poultry: 165 F
  • Uncooked pork and ham: 160 F
  • Pre-cooked ham: 140 F

Spring Is a Great Time to Quit Smoking!
  • Smoking can cause breathing problems, and can make asthma and pneumonia worse.
  • Smoking can also lead to heart disease and stroke.
  • Smoking can cause cancer of the lungs, esophagus, larynx (voice box), mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, pancreas, stomach, and cervix.

These chemicals are found in cigarettes and their smoke:

  • Ammonia (used in cleaners)
  • Methanol (used in rocket fuel)
  • Carbon Monoxide
  • Arsenic (a poison)
  • Methane (found in sewer gas)
  • Acetic Acid (found in vinegar)
  • Butane (used in lighter fluid)
  • Cadmium (used in batteries)
  • Stearic Acid (used in candle wax)
  • Hexamine (used in lighter fluid)
  • Toluene (used in paint thinner)
  • Nicotine (used in insecticide)

THERE IS HOPE. If you want to quit smoking, try these things:

  • Pick a quit date. Choose a date and stick to it.
  • Cut back. Cut down the number of cigarettes you smoke before your quit date.
  • Read. Get information that can give you hope and advice while you’re quitting.
  • Track your progress. Find a tool that can help show how well your quit attempt is going. Visit www.determinedtoquit.com.
  • Use the buddy system. Find a friend who is trying to quit smoking.
  • Get group support. Meet and help support other people who are trying to quit. Find a free class in your area at www.smokefreephilly.com or call 215-683-LIVE.
  • Talk to a quit coach. Get help to quit at a time that is convenient for you through free phone-based counseling at 1-800-QUIT-NOW.
  • Get help to quit. Consider using over-the-counter nicotine patches or gum that can help with cravings. Talk to your doctor about the medications that can help with cravings.
  • Get exercise. Exercise can relax you and help take your mind off smoking.


These chemicals are found in cigarettes and their smoke:

  • Ammonia (used in cleaners)
  • Methanol (used in rocket fuel)
  • Carbon Monoxide
  • Arsenic (a poison)
  • Methane (found in sewer gas)
  • Acetic Acid (found in vinegar)
  • Butane (used in lighter fluid)
  • Cadmium (used in batteries)
  • Stearic Acid (used in candle wax)
  • Hexamine (used in lighter fluid)
  • Toluene (used in paint thinner)
  • Nicotine (used in insecticide)

Some rewards of quitting:

  • Decreased risk of cancer and heart disease
  • Everyday activities no longer leave you out of breath (like climbing stairs)
  • Breath smells better
  • Clothes and hair smell better
  • Fingers and fingernails don’t look so yellow
  • Sense of smells goes back to normal
  • Food tastes better


Talk to your doctor to see if you should take medication to help you quit.

  • City health centers have smoking cessation programs for their patients. Some medications are provided free of charge. Click here to find a health center near you.
  • For more information about tools and resources to help you quit, click here.

You're twice as likely to quit for good when you quit with help. For help quitting, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for free phone-based counseling.