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Immunizations for Adults

We need immunizations throughout our life to protect us and those around us from serious diseases. Some vaccines are recommended for all adults. For example, a tetanus booster shot is recommended for all adults every 10 years, and all adults should receive a flu shot each year. Other vaccines that an adult needs can depend on their age, health condition, lifestyle, and job. You can get these adult vaccines from your doctor or pharmacist.

Click here to see the recommended adult immunization schedule.

Influenza (Flu)

Influenza (Flu) is a highly contagious respiratory illness. It can be especially harmful for older people, and cause hospitalization or death.

Everyone 6 months of age and older should receive a flu shot each year before or during flu season (begins in October). Adults 65 years and older can receive a high dose flu shot.

Pneumococcal Disease

Pneumococcal disease is a bacterial infection, which can cause pneumonia (lung infection).

All adults 65 years of age or older should receive pneumococcal vaccines: a dose of PCV13 followed by a dose of PPSV23 at least one year later.

Shingles (Zoster)

The zoster virus is the same virus that causes chickenpox. It can also cause shingles, a painful rash that develops on the face or body. About 1 in 3 people will develop shingles in their lifetime.

All adults 60 years of age or older should receive the shingles vaccine.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious liver infection, that can cause cancer. It is spread through birth, sex, sharing needles or razors, and contact with infected blood.

Adults who have any of those risk factors, or who are traveling to areas of the world where Hepatitis B is common, should receive the Hepatitis B vaccine.

Tetanus Booster

All adults need a tetanus booster once every 10 years.

Pregnant women should get a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) vaccine during every pregnancy to protect the baby.

Uninsured Adults

Don’t have insurance? If you live in Philadelphia, and are uninsured, you may be able to get the vaccines you need at a Health Department Health Center or a Federally Qualified Health Center.

Travel Vaccines

People traveling internationally may need vaccines that we do not normally receive in the U.S. Not all healthcare providers keep these vaccines stocked. First, talk to your primary care provider. You can also contact your local pharmacy and ask if they stock the vaccines you need.

Click here for more information on travel vaccines.
Click here for a printable list of these providers.


Resources

Adult Vaccines (English)
Adult Vaccines (Spanish)
Adult Vaccine Resource Guide (English and Spanish)