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Division of Disease Control

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Viral Hepatitis Surveillance and Prevention Program

Viral hepatitis is an infection that affects the liver. There are six different viruses that can cause hepatitis: A, B, C, D, E, and G. The most common types found in the United States are hepatitis A , hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is an acute infection that is primarily transmitted by the fecal-oral route (i.e. when an uninfected person ingests food or water that has been contaminated with the feces of an infected person).


Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C

Hepatitis B and C are transmitted through bodily fluids such as blood and semen. They can cause chronic, persistent infections, which can lead to chronic liver disease.

The Viral Hepatitis Surveillance and Prevention Program works to prevent the spread of hepatitis B and hepatitis C in Philadelphia.


Perinatal Hepatitis

If you are pregnant and have hepatitis, you may pass the hepatitis to your unborn child at birth. This is known as perinatal hepatitis.


Program Goals and Resources

The Viral Hepatitis Surveillance and Prevention Program has three goals:

  • to show the amount of acute and chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C disease in Philadelphia,
  • to work with the medical community to improve reporting and prevention activities for these diseases, and
  • to develop best practices to help populations infected with hepatitis B and hepatitis C to get tested, linked to care, retained in care, treated, and cured.

For up-to-date statistics, visit our Health Information Portal.

For resources in Philadelphia, visit Philly Hepatitis.

Visit the pages below to learn more about hepatitis: