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Frequently Asked Questions

General

What is the Office of Property Assessment?

On October 1, 2010, the Office of Property Assessment (OPA) replaced the Board of Revision of Taxes (BRT) for the purpose of making annual assessments of real property for taxation. OPA employs a full-time staff of Evaluators, managers, programmers, clerical support, and assistants to conduct the day-to-day operation of the valuation function. The BRT now functions as a body to hear assessment appeals.

What is 'real property'?

Real property is commonly referred to as real estate and includes the land and improvements on the land (such as a home or garage). Real property does not include your personal property (such as a car or furniture).

What do I need to do in order to subdivide my property? What do I need to do to consolidate several neighboring properties into a single property with a single tax bill?

  • Unrecorded Deed of Subdivision or Consolidation with the Department of Records:
    • Provide an approved site or survey plan indicating the existing and proposed lot configuration lines. Include new property legal descriptions, if available. (May be obtained from the appropriate Survey District).
    • Provide an approved Zoning Permit that authorizes the relocation of the lot lines, which is issued by the Department of Licenses and Inspections
  • Submit the above documents, with a cover letter noting:
    • Current OPA addresses and account numbers of locations in the Zoning Permit(s).
    • Addresses that you would prefer to use for the new lot configuration(s), if applicable.
    • That you intend to record with the City of Philadelphia, Department of Records, the appropriate deed(s) confirming the approved new lot configurations.
    • That you will NOTIFY the OPA when you can provide the recorded Deed Document ID Numbers, and
    • A name, postal address or email address, where the statement of proposed OPA addresses and account numbers should be sent.
  • If the documentation is in order, a statement of proposed addresses and account numbers can usually be produced and sent within five (5) business days. Statements may be used to proceed with the Licenses and Inspections Use Permit Applications and Building Permit Applications.
  • Current OPA addresses and account numbers will be deleted and proposed OPA addresses and accounts will be activated for the tax year following the year of conveyance on the Recorded Deed.
  • Submit your request by mail to:
               The Office of Property Assessment
               Curtis Center, Suite 300 West
               601 Walnut St 
               Philadelphia, PA 19106
               Attn: New Addresses/Accounts Request

Failure to comply fully with the requirements above may result in delays in processing the request.

Where can I find an overview of the zoning code outline?

The Department of Licenses & Inspections has information about the zoning code outline.

Where can I verify zoning information?

Verify zoning information with the Department of Licenses & Inspections or call 215-686-2420.

Where can I get information on permits?

The Department of Licenses & Inspections (L& I) handles permit issuance. To make an inquiry in person, visit L & I on the concourse level of the Municipal Services Building at 1401 JFK Blvd. Or call 215-686-2473 for additional information.

What do I do if I suspect I am a victim of deed fraud?

  • If you are the victim of property fraud, please do the following:
    • Visit the Department of Records to obtain a copy of the deed or mortgage in question.
    • Or to apply in person, visit Room 154 of City Hall.
    • Written requests should be sent to:
                        Department of Records
                        Room 154, City Hall
                        Philadelphia, PA 19107
                        Attn: Supervisor
    • Notify the District Attorney's Office, Economic Crime Unit at 215-686-9902.
    • Obtain the services of a real estate lawyer AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. Contact the Lawyer's Referral and Information Services of the Philadelphia Bar Association at 215-238-6333.

How can I find my OPA Account Number?

The OPA Account Number is a unique 9-digit number that identifies a property and is the same as the old BRT Account Number. If you don’t know your OPA Account Number, you can look it up using your property address or find it on your Real Estate Tax bill. You must include your OPA Account Number on the Homestead Exemption application.

Where can I find information about Permits & Zoning?

Where can I find information on Tax Payment and Lien Information?

Where can I find information about Assessment Appeals?

Where can I find information about Deed and Mortgage Records?

Where can I find information about properties owned by the PRA as well as properties available for purchase?

Where can I find information about property owned by the City of Philadelphia that is currently available for bid?

How do I obtain a CD of OPA Property Records?

You may purchase the OPA's property CD by sending your request, on your letterhead (along with a check in the amount
of $100 made payable to the "City of Philadelphia") to:
IT Division
City of Philadelphia
Office of Property Assessment
Curtis Center
601 Walnut Street, Suite 300 West
Philadelphia, PA 19106

  • You can also submit your request through the OPA's Customer Service Center.
The CD contains five files: property, street code, building code, off property, and land use. It contains all properties currently in the OPA's files for the City of Philadelphia. It is created monthly and costs $100 per CD. A data dictionary accompanies the CD. All files are formatted as comma delimited text.

Property Valuation

How is the market value developed for my property?

State Assessment Law mandates that the Office of Property Assessment consider three approaches in developing market values:

  • sales comparison,
  • income, and
  • cost.

For residential properties, the sales comparison approach is most frequently used. This method compares recently sold, reasonably similar properties within a short distance of a specific property or block. Adjustments to values are then made for known differences, resulting in a fair market value.

Isn't ‘market value’ what I paid for my property?

Not always. Market Value has been defined by the State Supreme Court as "the price in a competitive market a purchaser, willing but not obligated to buy, would pay an owner, willing but not obligated to sell, taking into consideration all legal uses to which the property can be adapted and might reasonably be applied." The price refers to the current value of the property as it stands today, which may be significantly different than what was paid for the property at another point in time or in different condition or use.

Depending on the circumstances involved in a sale, some people may have overpaid for a property. Yet others may have purchased their property at a bargain price. What was paid for a property years ago may not reflect what a property is worth in the current market. The property itself may also have changed in some significant way, such as building an addition or a total rehabilitation. Market value is always defined as of the date of the appraisal.

What is a Real Property assessment?

An assessment is the value that is multiplied by the current tax rate to determine the amount of real estate taxes that you pay on your property. The assessment is sometimes a percentage (referred to or known as the Pre-Determined Assessment Ratio) of the market value of your property. In Philadelphia, that percentage is currently 32% of the market value.

What is 'Millage' and how is it determined?

Millage is another term for tax rate, expressed as tax dollars per thousand dollars of Assessed value. City Council sets the tax rates for the City and School District, which are then applied to the assessment to determine the taxes due. In cases where the entire assessment is not taxable, such as properties with abatements or exemptions, the tax rate is applied only to the taxable portion of the assessment.

For Tax Year 2014, the Millage for the City is $6.02 and $7.38 for the School District. Together, the Millage used to determine your real estate taxes is $13.40 per thousand dollars. This translates to a tax rate of 1.34%.

What is the difference between assessed value and taxes?

The assessed value is the basis used by the City and the School District to determine your Real Estate Taxes.

  • The Real Estate Tax is determined by using the following formula:

                     MARKET VALUE (MV) 
                     = ASSESSED VALUE (AV) 
                     x TAX RATE (TR)
                     = REAL ESTATE TAX (RET) 

Example:    $50,000 (MV)  
                     = 50,000 (AV)
                     x .0134 (TR) 
                     = $ 670.00 (RET) 

The Evaluator does not set the tax rate. The Evaluator analyzes the market and utilizes the Office of Property Assessment’s valuation systems to determine the market value of your property.

*The Tax Rate for Tax Year 2014 is 1.34%. The Tax Rate may change on an annual basis.

What is meant by the term ‘Catastrophic Loss’?

‘Catastrophic Loss’ means any loss due to fire, flood or other natural disaster which affects the physical state of the real property and which exceeds fifty percent (50%) of the market value of the improvements on the real property prior to the catastrophic loss.

What do I do if I have a fire or other catastrophic loss?

  • You must file a Catastrophic Loss Application in order to report that there has been a catastrophic loss.
    • You must also file the application so that the Office of Property Assessement (OPA) can determine the new market value for the property. The OPA is mandated by Act No. 1984-175, to re-value a property in the following manner: " The value of the property before the catastrophic loss, based on the percentage of the taxable year for which the property stood at its former value, shall be added to the value of the property after the catastrophic loss, based on the percentage of the taxable year for which the property stood at its reduced value."
      • Example: A property has a fire in May 2012 and the fire affects 60% of the market value of $100,000.This means 33% (4 months divided by 12 months) of the taxable year is equal to a market value of $33,000 ($100,000 x 33%) prior to the fire. Sixty percent (60%) (fire damage) of $100,000 is equal to $40,000 market value after the fire. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the taxable year (8 months divided by 12 months) is equal to a market value of $26,800 ($40,000 x 67%). The new market value is $73,000 ($33,000 + $40,000).
    • Any adjustment in the assessment under this Act shall be reflected in the form of a credit for the succeeding tax year.
    • Applications for a reduction in the certified real property market value under this Act must be filed with the OPA, "WITHIN THE REMAINDER OF THE COUNTY FISCAL YEAR* IN WHICH THE CATASTROPHIC LOSS OCCURRED, OR WITHIN SIX MONTHS OF THE DATE ON WHICH THE CATASTROPHIC LOSS OCCURRED, WHICHEVER TIME PERIOD IS LONGER."
*“The fiscal year for the City of Philadelphia...beginning July 1 and ending June 30." Ordinance #2789, December 14, 1967.

What is a property reassessment?

A property reassessment is a reevaluation of real property in Philadelphia with a goal of ensuring that all property values are in compliance with state statutes, applicable laws, and industry standards.

Who can I contact for more information about property assessments?

Contact the Office of Property Assessment’s Customer Service Center at (215) 686-4334.

Who do I contact if I need to discuss the Market Value of my property or if I need any other information concerning my Real Estate Taxes?

Submit an inquiry or contact the OPA’s Customer Service Center at (215) 686-4334.

What is the ultimate goal of the new assessments?

  • A reassessment is the reevaluation of all real property in Philadelphia with a goal of making sure that all values are fair and in compliance with state statutes, laws, and industry standards.
  • The goal is to make sure that properties of the same value are being assessed -- and taxed -- at the same rate.

Homestead Exemption

What is the Homestead Exemption?

It’s a program that will help Philadelphia homeowners reduce the taxable assessed value (effective for Tax Year 2014 and beyond) used for calculation of their tax bill. Owning your home and residing in it as your primary residence are the only qualifications for the program. Get more information about the Homestead Exemption.

Who is eligible for the Homestead Exemption?

All homeowners in Philadelphia that use their property as their primary residence are eligible; there are no income or age restrictions. To determine if the property is your permanent residence, the Office of Property Assessment may consider a number of factors, including but not limited to:
  • Where your children are registered for school;
  • Residency in another state;
  • The address where you are registered to vote;
  • The address on your driver’s license or identification card;
  • Vehicle registration; and
  • The address on your federal income tax returns.

Where do I mail the Homestead Exemption application?

Applications can be mailed to:
          Office of Property Assessment
          P.O. Box 52817
          Philadelphia, PA 19115

Am I eligible for the Homestead Exemption if I have a mortgage on my house?

Yes.

Am I eligible for the Homestead Exemption if I am delinquent on my taxes?

Yes.

What is a co-op/cooperative and how do I know if I live in one?

A housing cooperative is when people own and operate the building where they live, but do not own individual units—forming a cooperative corporation. The corporation owns the actual building and people pay the right to occupy a unit within the co-op. (The unit is usually referred to as "your apartment.")

If each month you pay an amount that covers your share of the expenses of the co-op—and pay all or a portion of your real estate taxes jointly through a management agent or association, rather than paying your taxes separately from other units, then you most likely live in a co-op.

How do I remove a deceased spouse/parent from the property record?

In order for the Office of Property Assessment (OPA) to update the property to the surviving party's name, a new deed will need to be recorded for the property.

Take the following steps to record a new deed:
  1. Obtain a copy of the deceased's death certificate.
  2. Then go to a local real estate attorney, title insurer or Realtor, and have them draw up a new deed transferring property from the deceased party and the taxpayer, to just the taxpayer.
  3. Have the new deed recorded with the City's Department of Records. The surviving spouse does not need to pay a recording fee provided he/she presents a copy of the death certificate and the marriage license to Records.
  4. Once it is recorded with the Dept. of Records, the OPA is legally able to update the record.

Visit the Department of Records for additional information or call 215-686-2260.

How can I verify that you received my Homestead application?

If you applied for the Homestead Exemption on/before Sept. 13, 2013, and were approved, the amount you were approved for will appear under "Homestead" if you search your property via the OPA's Property Search.

Or contact the Homestead Hotline at 215-686-9200 to check on the status of your application.




My name is not on the deed to the house, but I am responsible for it, can I get the Homestead Exemption?

  • If your name is not on the deed for one of the following reasons, you may be eligible for a conditional Homestead Exemption. For example, you have inherited the house in which you live from a deceased relative, but the deceased relative’s name is on the most recent deed and your name is not; a fraudulent mortgage or deed was recorded for your house; or you entered into a rent-to-own agreement (also called lease/purchase agreements or installment land contracts) to buy the house and have paid all or some of the purchase price for the house, but your name is not on the deed to the house.

 

  • Being granted a Homestead Exemption does not mean you are the owner, and the OPA strongly suggests that you take the necessary steps to get the title issues resolved. The Homestead Exemption will be conditionally granted for no more than three (3) years from the date of your application, at which time the property must be in your name or the Homestead Exemption will be revoked.

I inherited the house from a deceased relative but his/her name is on the deed and the Homestead application I received in the mail. Can I get the Homestead Exemption?

You need to have the deed changed into your name. The OPA understands that this may take some time and will offer a conditional Homestead Exemption while you complete that process. Being granted a Homestead Exemption does not mean you are the owner, and we strongly suggest that you take the necessary steps to get the title issues resolved. The Homestead Exemption will be conditionally granted for no more than three (3) years from the date of your application, at which time the property must be in your name or the Homestead Exemption will be revoked.

How do I apply if my name is not on the deed, but I meet the criteria for the conditional Homestead Exemption?

In order to receive the conditional Homestead Exemption, you must submit:

  1. A paper Homestead Exemption application using YOUR NAME, not the name of the person listed on the deed, even if you receive an application with the person listed on the deed pre-filled in. If you are using a pre-printed form, cross out the pre-printed name and print yours. You will not be able to apply online. Write "TANGLED TITLE" on the top of the application.
  2. A completed and signed Homestead Affidavit (Affidavit also available in PDF-format)
  3. Provide two (2) copies of the following, showing your name and the address of the property you are seeking the Homestead Exemption for:
    • Government-issued ID—Acceptable forms are:
      • Photo IDs issued by the U.S. Federal Government or the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (including the Department of State Voter ID Card)
      • PA Driver's License or Non-Driver's License Photo ID
      • Valid U.S. Passport
      • U.S. military ID—active duty and retired military (a military or veteran's ID must designate an expiration date or designate that the expiration date is indefinite). Military dependents' ID must contain an expiration date.
      • Employee Photo ID issued by Federal, PA, PA County or PA Municipal government
    • Utility Bills: PGW, Water Revenue, PECO, or cable from the last 6 months.
    • Voter Registration Card
    • Lease/purchase or rent-to-own agreement
    • Mortgage Agreement
Once you have all of the necessary documents together, mail to:

Office of Property Assessment
P.O. Box 52817
Philadelphia, PA 19115

It is your responsibility to complete the required steps to put the title of the property into your name. Assuming you are otherwise eligible, you will conditionally receive the Homestead Exemption for no more than three (3) years from the date of your application. At the end of those three years, the Homestead Exemption will be revoked if you have not had the title transferred into your name and you will not be able to reapply until you are the owner listed on the deed.

I tried to apply for the Homestead Exemption online, but it still has the old owner listed. How can I apply?

The online Homestead Exemption application may lag in updating ownership records. Please submit a paper application instead.

How will I know that I have been enrolled in the Homestead Exemption Program?

If you have been approved, you can look-up your property information or call 215-686-9200 to check on the status.

Or you can visit the AVI Calculator to check on the status of your Homestead application and to estimate your Real Estate Taxes.


How much will the Homestead Exemption program cost the City?

The cost will depend on the number of enrollees.

Why isn't the City focusing on people who are already not paying their taxes, rather than running these programs and asking people to pay more?

The City is stepping up its enforcements of collecting delinquent taxes, but now the City also has the opportunity to create a better, fairer system for all Philadelphia taxpayers/property owners, and that's what we're trying to do.

What if there is a change to my property and I want to remove the Homestead Exemption from my property?

  • If you need to cancel your Homestead Exemption because your property no longer qualifies, you must notify the Office of Property Assessment (OPA) within 45 days of the change.
  • Complete the Homestead Exemption Removal/Change form and submit to the OPA. To remove the Homestead Exemption for Tax Year 2015, the form must be filed by Sept. 13, 2014.
    • This form can also be submitted if you need to change the percentage of your property used for something other than your primary residence, such as a business or rental property. You must notify the OPA of this change as well.
  • If the use of your property changes and you are not sure if it still qualifies for the Homestead Exemption, you should contact the OPA at 215-686-4334.

How do I check my Homestead status online?

Use the property search feature to look-up your property address. If you have been approved for the Homestead, under 'Homestead Exemption' will be the amount of the Exemption that has been granted.

If the Homestead value is $0 and you submitted an application, contact the Homestead Hotline at 215-686-9200.

However, if you applied after the Sept. 13, 2013 deadline, then your application status has not yet been reflected online.

I had previously been approved for the Homestead, but now it is no longer showing for my property. Why?

If the deed to your property changed for any reason (this includes, but is not limited to a change to your name or the addition of another name to the deed), the Homestead Exemption will be removed from your property and you must simply reapply. Re-apply by September 13, 2014 for Homestead Exemption applied to your 2015 assessment.

What if I missed the Sept. 13, 2013 Homestead Exemption deadline?

If you did not apply for the Homestead Exemption in Tax Year 2014, apply for Tax Year 2015--the deadline is September 13, 2014. Find out how to apply.

How can I apply for the Homestead Exemption?

There are three ways to apply for the Homestead Exemption:

The deadline to apply for Tax Year 2015 is September 13, 2014.

Once you have been approved for the Homestead Exemption, it will remain on your property and there is no need to reapply each year. The only time the Homestead will be removed is if you sell the property or the deed to the property changes for ANY reason. At that point, you must reapply.

My Homestead application was denied. Why?

If you applied by the Sept. 13, 2013 deadline and received a denial letter, the reason for denial will be listed in the letter.

The reasons why a Homestead application could not be approved are as follows—

  • Reason A: INCOMPLETE – One of the required questions on the application was not answered. If your application was incomplete, you may reapply for Tax Year 2015 by submitting a new Homestead application by September 13, 2014.
  • Reason B: OWNER MISMATCH – The name of the property owner in the OPA records for the property did not match the name listed on your application. In the event that you claim ownership of a property that is your primary residence, pay utility bills for that property, etc., but the deed has another name listed as the owner (perhaps a relative who owned the property, but is now deceased), this is referred to as a 'Tangled Title'. For people in this situation, OPA will grant a conditional Homestead Exemption for three (3) years while you work to get the title into your name. You will need to reapply by submittinh a newHomestead application, submit copies of your ID and other documents, and complete the Homestead Affidavit. If the mismatch is due to a name change, contact 215‐686‐9200 to update the records and then reapply for the Homestead Exemption.
  • Reason C: NOT PRIMARY RESIDENCE – You have indicated that the property is not your primary residence and/or the property is used for something other than residential purposes. If you claim another property as your primary residence—and because no one can have more than one primary residence at a time—the Homestead Exemption cannot be granted. Additionally, if the property is used as a rental that is not owner-occupied or is used 100% for non-residential purposes, the Homestead Exemption cannot be granted. However, if this property IS your primary residence, you can reapply for Tax Year 2015 by submitting a new Homestead application by September 13, 2014.
  • Reason D: OTHER PRIMARY RESIDENCE – You have indicated that you have more than one primary residence. Because no one can have more than one primary residence at a time, the Homestead Exemption cannot be granted. However, if this property is your ONLY primary residence, you can reapply for Tax Year 2015 by submitting a new Homestead application by September 13, 2014.
  • Reason E: LOCAL ADDRESS MISMATCH – The OPA did not have a record for the address or account number listed on the application, or there was conflicting information provided on the application. A new Homestead Exemption application should be submitted with correct information by September 13, 2014.

For additional questions regarding the Homestead, please contact the Homestead Hotline at 215-686-9200.


FALSE OR FRAUDULENT APPLICATIONS
The OPA may select, randomly or otherwise, applications to review for false or fraudulent information. Any person who files an application that contains false information, or who does not notify the OPA of a change in use which no longer qualifies as a Homestead property, will:
  • Be required to pay the taxes which would have been due but for the false application, plus interest.
  • Be required to pay a penalty equal to 10% of the unpaid taxes.
  • If convicted of filing a false application, be guilty of a misdemeanor of the third degree and be sentenced to pay a fine not exceeding $2,500.

What if I disagree with the reason my Homestead Exemption was denied?

If you do not agree with the determination by the Office of Property Assessment, you may file a formal appeal with the Board of Revision of Taxes (BRT) within 30 days of the date of your denial notice. Contact the BRT directly at 215-686-4343 or 215-686-9283.

For additional questions regarding the Homestead, please contact the Homestead Hotline at 215‐686‐9200.

I applied for the 2014 Homestead Exemption as a new homebuyer. How do I know if I was approved?

Homestead approvals are posted with a property’s valuation data on the OPA’s website. You can search for a property by its address or OPA account number. However, new homebuyer approvals have not yet been updated. If you submitted an application and want to check the status, please call the Homestead Hotline at 215-686-9200.

I was approved for the 2014 Homestead Exemption as a new homebuyer. Will I receive a reimbursement?

New homebuyers approved for the Homestead Exemption will receive reimbursement from the Department of Revenue.

Why is my Homestead Exemption amount less than $30,000?

If you have a Homestead amount of less than $30,000, this is because you indicated on your application that a portion of the property was used for something other than a primary residence. If the percentage of your property used for something else changes, then you must complete a Homestead Change/Removal Form.

For a property to receive the Homestead Exemption, the property must be used as the primary residence of an owner who is a natural person, and not a corporation. What is a “natural person”?

A natural person is a living, breathing human being. It is not a corporation, partnership, trust, etc.

If I was approved for the Homestead Exemption, do I have to apply every year?

Once you have been approved for the Homestead Exemption it will remain on your property and there is no need to reapply each year. However the Homestead will be removed if you sell the property or the deed to the property changes for ANY reason. At that point, you must reapply.

Appeals

What options do I have if I do not agree with my property’s assessed value?

Any property owner who disagrees with the assessed value of his/her property value may request a First Level Review by the Office of Property Assessment. You may include additional information, such as photos and recent appraisals. It is not a discussion of your taxes or the projected changes.

If you want to skip the First Level Review or you are not satisfied that the assessed value is correct after the First Level Review process, you may file an appeal with the Board of Revision of Taxes.

Can I have someone else file my First Level Review Request and/or participate in the First Level Review process?

If you (as the property owner) wish to have  someone else file the First Level Review Request form (one per parcel), as well as speak and/or meet with an Office of Property Assessment Evaluator (if necessary), on your behalf, you must complete the First Level Review Appointment of Authorized Representative Form and have it notarized. You must include this Authorization form when you submit your First Level Review Request.

Get more details about the First Level Review.

What happens if I miss the deadline to submit a First Level Review form?

The deadline for submitting a First Level Review form is 30 days from the date of your Assessment Notice.

If you miss the deadline to apply for the First Level Review, are not satisfied with the outcome, or decide to skip the First Level Review altogether, you may file a Formal Appeal with the Board of Revision of Taxes (BRT). Formal appeals are due to the BRT by the first Monday in October.

What if I want to "cancel" my request for a First Level Review?

Any property owner that wants to remove/cancel their request for a First Level Review must send something in writing to request the removal to:

Office of Property Assessment
601 Walnut Street - 3 West
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Attn: Joe Solomon

Tax Bills

Where can I get information about my Real Estate Taxes?

The City of Philadelphia's Department of Revenue is responsible for collecting Real Estate Taxes. Visit Revenue for information regarding the billing, collecting, and accounting of Real Estate Taxes. Or contact them at (215) 686-6442.

Are there programs available for low-income and/or senior citizens to assist with real estate taxes?

  • There is a Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program available from the Commonwealth of PA, for eligible Pennsylvanians age 65 and older; widows and widowers age 50 and older; and people with disabilities age 18 and older. To apply, you must request an application or call 1-888-222-9190.  
  • The City of Philadelphia has two assistance programs for current year real estate taxes. Visit Revenue or call (215) 686-6442 for more information.
    • Low-Income Senior Citizen Tax Freeze--Eligible low-income senior citizens, who apply by October, can keep their real estate taxes in the next year and all future years from increasing, whether due to changes in assessments or tax rates. There is no need to reapply for the program as long as the financial situation and ownership status of the property does not change. The current application has old dates, but will be accepted; Revenue is in the process of updating forms.
    • Low-Income and Low-Income Senior Citizen Installment Plans- Eligible low-income persons and low-income senior citizens who apply by March of the current tax year can have their current year real estate tax payments split out over eight (8) monthly payments. Future years' real estate taxes will then be split over the full year into 12 monthly payments. There is no need to reapply for the program as long as the financial situation and ownership status of the property does not change.
  • For delinquent real estate taxes, in addition to a standard payment agreement of 25% down with the balance paid out to up to 24 months, the City's Department of Revenue offers a Hardship Payment Agreement, which is payment plan for those who verify that they are low-income. Complete the Low-Income and Extended Term Agreement Application to apply.

Get more information about these programs.

What is a Disabled Veteran Real Estate Tax Exemption?

A veteran who is 100% service-connected disabled (or their surviving spouse) who demonstrates a financial need may qualify for a 100% exemption from real estate taxes. To apply for this Exemption, contact the Philadelphia County Veterans Affairs Director at 215-686-3256.

Who can I contact to request a duplicate tax bill?

Call the Department of Revenue’s Bill Service Unit at 215-686-2040.

Can I pay my Real Estate Tax without a tax bill?

  • If you have no bill and want to mail the Real Estate Tax payment in, you must send it to:
               City of Philadelphia Department of Revenue 
               P.O. Box 8049 
               Philadelphia, PA 19101-8049. 
  • If you opt to send in a payment and have NO bill, make sure you have the OPA account number on the check/money order. Although the 2014 Tax Bill payment deadline is March 31, 2014, a 1% discount will be applied if paid by February 28, 2014.

Are there going to be other programs to help me pay my Real Estate Taxes?

In addition to the programs already being offered by the City of Philadelphia and other agencies, a new program: PHL Tax LOOP, has been created to help longtime homeowners.

Who do I contact about tax payments or delinquent taxes?

Email the Department of Revenue regarding all tax payment or tax collection issues or contact them at (215) 686-6442.